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Los Angeles City Controller Candidate Cary Brazeman Weighs in on Chick-fil-A Controversy: "Should we be eating anti-gay-marriage chicken?"

Jul 31, 2012 (06:07 PM EDT)
URL: http://www.techweb.com/show-press-release/X915991/los-angeles-city-controller-candidate-cary-brazeman-weighs-in-on-chick-fil-a-controversy-should-we-be-eating-anti-gay-marriage-chicken.html

LOS ANGELES, July 31, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- In a personal blog post published last night, Los Angeles City Controller Candidate Cary Brazeman (www.CaryBrazeman.com) weighed in on the Chick-fil-A controversy, asking a series of questions relevant to consumers, public officials and private citizens. You can read the full text of his blog post at http://blog.CaryBrazeman.com/ or here:

I've been asked to comment on the Chick-fil-A controversy as a prospective Los Angeles City official and someone who happens to be gay and Jewish. In advance of "National Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day" and a rumored same-sex kiss-in series of protests … here we go into the deep fat fryer!

The Chick-fil-A controversy started after published comments by the company's CEO expressing opposition to same-sex marriage. A closer look reveals Chick-fil-A's long history as a self-described Christian company operating on "biblical principles."

Here are key questions it's reasonable to ask as consumers, public officials and private citizens:

1.  Should we be purchasing the products of a company opposed to gay marriage?

The issue of gay marriage, even "civil" marriage, is unavoidably political and religious. I have my views; you have your views. Reasonable people can disagree. Reasonable people also can disagree about whether the company's stand on gay marriage is a sufficient reason to take your appetite somewhere else.

2.  Should the City be permitting Chick-fil-A restaurants in Los Angeles?

I agree with New York's Mayor Bloomberg that cities cannot, and really should not, impose political or religious litmus tests on businesses. (What a slippery slope that would be!) But all businesses, of course, are required to follow the rules of doing business in our cities in order to operate. That goes without saying.

There are additional questions I am curious about, the answers to which may affect how we answer questions #1 and #2.

3.  Is Chick-fil-A an equal opportunity employer? Do they hire and treat respectfully openly gay people, non-Christians, and people of varying ethnicities?

4.  Company management boasts that key executives all are married to their first wives. Does this mean the company doesn't hire divorced people?

5.  What about promotions? Can you rise through the ranks at Chick-fil-A if you are any of the above?

6.  What about ownership and franchise opportunities? Are some people not eligible based on personal or religious characteristics?

I asked the company these questions.

On Saturday, I visited the two Chick-fil-A restaurants in Los Angeles: the one in Hollywood, which is a franchise, and the one downtown near USC, which is a company-owned restaurant. Managers at both locations asserted to me that Chick-fil-A is an equal opportunity employer.

Is this true? I hope so.

For more information on Cary Brazeman's campaign for Los Angeles City Controller, please visit http://www.CaryBrazeman.com/.

SOURCE Brazeman For Controller 2013