Oct 25, 2007 (10:10 AM EDT)
Apple Launches iPhone Resource Center For Developers

Read the Original Article at InformationWeek

Want to develop applications for the iPhone? Apple has launched an iPhone developer center for people just like you.

The iPhone Dev Center, introduced Wednesday, is a new section of Apple's Developer Connection site. The new addition offers information on designing, coding, and optimizing performance of applications that run in the iPhone's Safari Web browser. Software built for the iPhone also can run on Apple's new iPod Touch, a portable media player with the iPhone's touch-screen interface and other software, but is not a cellular phone.

The center focuses on Web applications only, and doesn't contain information on Apple's upcoming software development kit for building native applications that run on the operating system of the iPhone and iPod Touch. Apple last week said it plans to make that SDK available in February.

The iPhone Dev Center includes sections on the latest techniques for Web app design, some of which is presented through video discussions with iPhone engineers. In addition, the site has sample code and a reference library for release notes and technical documentation.

And while the Web is always changing, Apple notes, it asks that anyone building applications stick to the most current languages such as: HTML 4.01, XHTML 1.0, CSS 2.1 and partial CSS3, ECMAScript 3 (JavaScript), W3C DOM Level 2, and Ajax technologies, including XMLHTTPRequest .

"Stick with standards when you design Web pages for iPhone," Apple said in its Optimizing Web Applications and Content for iPhone reference page. "Safari on iPhone shares the same Web Kit engine as Safari on the computer desktop."

Finished applications can be submitted to Apple for listing in the company's Web apps library. Featured applications in the library include an online repository for snippets of information, a calculator for determining disk space for video footage, and a personal productivity tool that provides to-do lists and personal notes.

Determined software developers have attacked Apple's initial efforts to keep the iPhone closed to native applications and locked to the AT&T cellular network. AT&T is the exclusive U.S. service provider for the iPhone, and developers have posted applications on the Web for opening the device to other cellular networks. Apple estimates that a quarter million iPhones have been unlocked.